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Japanese job seekers fighting discrimination

There is no denial to the fact that the Japan is one of the most fiercely competitive nation among all, and has stressful and intense recruitment process, even for the graduates from all across the world. Talking of the highly rigid experience, the way one should be dressing up is one of the most significant demands that the highly educated people out there have to encounter. We see quite a lot of people raising their voices against the system, and probably things are going to change for the good in the upcoming days. 

Yumi Mizuno talking about sexism

While speaking, Yumi makes use of feminine pronouns. She identifies herself as non binary, and use an umbrella term to refer to people who do not see their own gender as exclusively male or female. She prefers to call her gender as ‘neutral,’ in Japanese, ‘jibun,’ which means ‘myself.’ 

She even talked about her own experience back in the year 2011 when she used to be one of the thousand students and had to go around hunting for a job. She said that they used to be dressed in black and take part in the highly structured, long recruitment process that takes up almost a year’s span. This process used to be known as “Shushoku Katsudo,” or “Shukatsu” in short. The applicants are required to wear recruit suits that come in basically 2 varieties, the one is a men’s suit and a white shirt with a dark colored tie. The second variety used to be adorned basically by women wherein they had to wear a skirt, a white blouse along with a jacket which used to be clinched in at the waist region. 

She talked about her own experience with the recruitment companies and the clothing brands that used to come up with their own sets of guidelines about how to dress and which haircut is going to go apt. She said, “They only provide etiquette and clothing instructions based on a gender binary, for men and women.” She added on, “and I felt I couldn’t fit in either of them.” “It’s very scary, because in Japan we’re taught to get a job before we graduate from university.”